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Archive for the ‘Featured’ Category

New E-Mail address

June 7th, 2012

info@BubbyRuthsBakery.com

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Gluten Free Gingerbread Houses – Kosher Parve Organic & Yummy

December 20th, 2011

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Novak Djokovic Loves Gluten Free

September 12th, 2011
Novak Djokovic Claims Gluten Free Diet Improves His Tennis Game

Yummy - Low Carb, Gluten Free, Organic, Vegan, Kosher Parve Goodies

According to a recent story in Yahoo Sports News, Championship tennis player, Novak Djokovic recently switched to a gluten free diet after seeing a nutritionist and being allergy tested positive for gluten.  Since then,he had won the Davis Cup and the Australian Open.  Additionally he has been in the U.S. Open finals and is currently on a 39 match winning streak.

Did the GF Diet Improve His Performance?

Many adapt the diet because they have developed a gluten sensitivity related illness, but what are the implications for someone who is not overtly sick.  It is my own clinical experience that athletes are often able to improve their performance and endurance by going on a GF diet. Why?

  • Less immune system overload
  • Better nutrient absorption from food
  • Better gut motility and function
  • Reduced systemic inflammation
  • Faster recovery time
  • Better oxygen utilization…

The protein is known to cause abnormal immune function, inflammation, malnutrition, and more.  The problem is that gluten can cause all of these issues silently (hence the term silent celiac).  For example, an autoimmune reaction against the muscle tissue can occur for years before it becomes clinically recognized.  If this happens to an athlete, recovery time and muscle strength will be affected.  Another example is the autoimmune reaction that occurs in asthma (a well known condition induced by grain ingestion).  If this happens to an athlete, lung function and oxygen capacity are affected, thus reducing the athletes aerobic capacity.

Other Athletic Success Stories -

Not only is it possible for a gluten free diet to improve athletic performance, it is common.  In my clinic, I see it all the time.  The spectrum of how people react is wide.  The following two examples illustrate this.

  1. Gluten (and other food intolerance issues) Destroyed Ian’s ability to be an athlete.  See his story here…
  2. Gluten free diet made this young athlete stronger and shortened his recovery times.  See his story here…

 

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Carr’s Gluten Free – Bubby Ruth’s Bakery

September 7th, 2011

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FDA Imposing Tough Regs on Gluten-free Products

September 1st, 2011

FDA Imposing Tough Regs on Gluten-free Products.

Gluten-free food has become popular and profitable — but sometimes products labeled “gluten free” — aren’t. Now, the Food and Drug Administration is preparing strict new standards – and that’s a relief for people who are allergic to gluten

Posted: 10:34 AM Aug 31, 2011
Reporter: CBS NEWS

(CBS News) Gluten-free food has become popular and profitable — but sometimes products labeled “gluten free” — aren’t.

Now, the Food and Drug Administration is preparing strict new standards – and that’s a relief for people who are allergic to gluten.

CBS News correspondent Elaine Quijano reported Jennifer Shannon is a careful shopper, double-checking labels to make sure the food she is buying is gluten-free.

Shannon told CBS News, “If a company is going to sell me a product based on the fact that it’s gluten-free, I think they should be held accountable for it.”

Shannon has celiac disease, an allergy to gluten, which is a protein found in common grains like wheat, rye and barley. About three million Americans now suffer from this disease, which can have a wide array of symptoms, such as bloating, constipation, problems digesting food, numbing feeling in the extremities, and for some sufferers a rash.

Right now, the gluten-free label on the products is not regulated — something the FDA is looking to change by establishing a tough new standard for labeling foods as gluten-free.

Gluten-free products have gone mainstream and are big business, ringing up $2.6 billion in sales – up 30 percent in the last five years. Kelloggs’ new gluten-free Rice Krispies is now a top seller.

Some celebrities are even advocating a gluten-free diet for health benefits alone. But not all doctors are on board.

Dr. Peter Green, director of the Celiac Disease Center at Columbia University Medical Center, told CBS News, “A gluten-free diet is not necessarily a healthy diet. People who are on a gluten free diet for an extended period can become iron-deficient and B Vitamin deficient.”

But for celiac patients like Jennifer Shannon, a gluten-free diet is the only treatment she has.

Shannon said, “Gluten-free food is the only medicine for celiac. It’s the only thing available and it’s a cure essentially. It’s how you heal yourself through eating and so knowledge of what’s in the food you’re eating is very important.”

The new standard, “Early Show” co-anchor Erica Hill noted, matches the one already in place in Europe. It’s expected to take effect early next year.

 

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Not Just a Celiac Issue

August 10th, 2011

The following picture displays some of the more common manifestations of gluten induced diseases.  Problem is, many people, doctors, nutritionists, and the media are mostly in the dark when it comes to the different diseases linked to this food protein.

Different manifestations of gluten induced damage

The following is an abstract from a recent paper published in the journal,    Rev Neurol. 2011 Sep 1;53(5):287-300.

Gluten sensitivity is a systemic autoimmune disease that occurs in genetically susceptible individuals on ingesting gluten. It can appear at any age, then becoming a permanent condition. It is more frequent in women, as happens with other autoimmune diseases. Celiac disease is the intestinal form and the most important manifestation among a set of gluten-induced autoimmune pathologies that affect different systems. Neurological manifestations of gluten sensitivity, with or without enteropathy, are also frequent, their pathogenesis including an immunological attack on the central and peripheral nervous tissue accompanied by neurodegenerative changes.  The clinical manifestations are varied, but the most common syndromes are cerebellar ataxia and peripheral neuropathy. Finally, gluten sensitivity is associated to a varying degree, with other complex diseases and could influence their evolution. The early detection of cases of gluten sensitivity with neurological manifestations and subsequent treatment with the gluten-free diet could provide remarkable benefits to the patients.

This research study is just another study of an ever growing list of medical research documenting the existence of gluten sensitivity in the absence of celiac disease.  Why is this important?  Most doctors don’t know the difference.  Most doctors aren’t aware that gluten can contribute to hundreds of symptoms, syndromes, and diseases.  Many of these symptoms manifest not in the gut, but in other tissues and organs.

Common examples of gluten related conditions are:

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Gluten Free Registry

June 26th, 2011


Find us on glutenfreeregistry.com

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The New York Times: Looking for a Plan B? Make It Gluten-Free.

June 26th, 2011

The New York Times

Kelly Shimoda for The New York Times

Cakes at the opening of By The Way Bakery in Hastings-on-Hudson, N.Y. More Photos »

By HILARY STOUT
Published: June 3, 2011
IF Helene Godin had decided to rethink her life at a different time, a bed and breakfast might have been her chosen fate. Or perhaps a little independent bookstore with a marmalade cat, good coffee and some comfortable armchairs.
Multimedia

But this being the second decade of the 21st century, Ms. Godin chose a different course after she quit her job as a Manhattan lawyer, resolved to temper her workaholic ways, and set out on a second career. She opened a gluten-free bakery.

So did Edie and Dan Irwin in Los Angeles after their graphic-design business faltered in the recession. (Their specialty is artisanal gluten-free bread.) And Christine Reed in Ashford, Conn., when she concluded that working as a buyer for a manufacturing company did not fulfill her soul. And Michelle Gillette in Bayport, on Long Island, when she gave up teaching high school Spanish. (The grand opening of her gluten-free bakery and cafe, called Ms. Michelle’s Urban Gourmet, took place on Memorial Day weekend.)

As long as there have been jobs, there have been fantasies about leaving them. Often this involves escapes to pretty settings (the proverbial bed and breakfast in Vermont), or fitness nirvana (ski instructor), and, if not financial reward, at least no irritating co-workers or domineering bosses (in fact, usually no bosses at all).

Some fantasies run their course; owning a little country newspaper, a common daydream of past generations of journalists, has all the allure of a migraine these days. But into the vacuum usually come other ideas more illustrative of a particular moment. And so it is today that we find the growing appeal of gluten-free, not just as a dietary regimen but as a professional Plan B.

Who even heard of gluten (or the lack thereof) a decade ago? The estimated 1.3 percent of the population who had celiac disease, which is basically an inability to digest gluten, did, but the general public awareness was minimal.

Now, many more people know that gluten is a protein contained in wheat, rye and barley, and it has a crucial elastic quality that holds together the ingredients of breads, cakes, cookies, pasta and most any other baked good you care to name. Those who are allergic to gluten, or who simply have a hard time digesting it, can’t eat many desserts or dietary staples like pizza or sandwiches.

Even those who can eat all the gluten they want increasingly have some vague idea that it’s healthier not to. Certainly many weekend athletes took notice recently when the tennis star Novak Djokovic partly attributed his stunning 40-plus-match winning streak to his gluten-free diet.

So naturally, gluten-free has become a growing business concept. The Gluten Free Registry (glutenfreeregistry.com), a database, now lists more than 19,000 “gluten-free friendly” establishments around the world. The Chicago Tribune named “gluten free” one of its top 10 buzzwords a few years ago. Ms. Reed’s gluten-free vegan bakery, called Shayna B’s & the Pickle (after her two dogs), got a big contract last month when it was hired to supply the Wesleyan University graduation with 1,300 gluten-free blondies, biscottis and chocolate chip cookies.

Helene Godin didn’t think or care about gluten — or baking, for that matter — when she was catching the 7:01 train to New York City every morning. In a 22-year career as a media and intellectual property lawyer, she had held some big, wonderful jobs — including positions at NBC, Reader’s Digest and Bloomberg.

She loved it. But, acknowledging her workaholic inclinations she said, “I realized I needed to stop.” With the encouragement of her husband and teenage sons, she walked into Bloomberg one day last spring and quit on the spot. “I’ve decided I don’t want to be a lawyer anymore,” she said.

On a recent Thursday morning, Ms. Godin was tending to last-minute details before her grand opening, which was to happen that Saturday, complete with a ribbon-cutting ceremony by Representative Nita M. Lowey. Everything looked perfect.

The door handle to the shop, on the main commercial thoroughfare in the Westchester County town of Hastings-on-Hudson, was made of a French rolling pin. The walls were freshly painted in a cheerful yellow (shade: buttercream) and rich brown (chocolate). Delectable raspberry muffins, ginger cookies, coconut cake, lemon cake and four-layer chocolate cakes lined the countertop. (She was offering samples to her many testers in town, not to mention to a reporter.) Neighboring merchants dropped by with good wishes. The liquor store guy came bearing a bottle of wine.

“I didn’t quit with any plan whatsoever,” Ms. Godin said. With her free time, she enrolled in a baking boot camp at a culinary institute (vegan baking, since that was the class with spots available) and came up with an idea. She had known she wanted her next act to be local (no more commuter trains), and ideally appealing enough that her sons would want to stop by on the way home from school. A bakery seemed to fit. Yet a regular bakery wouldn’t do it.

The baking boot-camp instructor had told the class that gluten-free was “hot” these days. Ms. Godin wanted to start a business that would be “a destination” for people in neighboring towns. People might not drive to Hastings for a raspberry muffin, she reasoned. But they might make the trip for a supremely delicious, healthful, gluten-free raspberry muffin, especially if allergies kept them from eating the regular kind. And she was going to work until she came up with the best, tastiest gluten-free treats around. “I didn’t want to do muffins that tasted like beans,” she said.

The trick for Ms. Godin (and herein likes the key for many gluten-free entrepreneurs) was not to turn off regular, allergy-free customers by trumpeting that all the offerings are gluten-free. Hence the name she came up with: By the Way Bakery (no “gluten-free” in the title). The concept: boy, this is delicious and, by the way, it’s gluten-free.

The appeal of gluten-free bakeries speaks to the current interest in food and health, and to our allergy-laden times. It also has that all-crucial Plan B element of providing joy, satisfaction and pleasure to others.

Ms. Gillette, the former Spanish teacher who opened a gluten-free bakery last weekend, spent her summer break teaching a baking class for children a few years ago. She found a startling number of them could not eat the treats they made because of allergies; the most common allergy was to gluten. “There’s nothing like seeing a five-year-old make a chocolate chip cookie and she can’t dive into it,” Ms. Gillette said. “It kind of broke my heart. I told myself I’m going to have to teach myself how to be a gluten-free chef.”

A number of gluten-free bakers, like Taylor Nicholson, a former litigation consultant, and Anne Hoyt, a former banker, were drawn to the business because of their own health issues. The pair, who are mother and daughter (Ms. Hoyt is the mother), suffer from celiac disease. After altering their own diet and cooking habits, and with the encouragement of friends, they decided they could put together a viable business selling the products of the gluten-free recipes they’d devised. They held their breath and quit their jobs. Their Wholesome Foods Bakery in East Dallas opened just over a year ago.

“It was very scary in the turbulent economic situation,” Ms. Nicholson said, “to quit a job that had a good career path for my mom and I. But I think we had a lot of faith in our product.”

So far, so good. “It’s been incredibly fun,” Ms. Nicholson said. “Owning your own business, your mind never shuts off. But it’s different, and we’re so passionate about what we’re doing.”

For others, gluten-free is a different sort of Plan B, a way to pick up the pieces after a previous professional life faltered. For years, the Irwins had been lucky to have corporate clients from the booming mortgage business for their graphic-design business, who had ample need for commissioning of logos, advertisements, invitations and other designs. The biggest lender of all, Countrywide Home Loans, was their biggest client.

Then came 2008, when Countrywide became the public symbol of ineptitude and corruption in the mortgage business — and the Irwin’s business went down, too.

But Edie Irwin had always loved to bake. She had already been doing some work on the side for a vegetarian restaurant and was becoming interested in gluten-free. “I’d tasted a lot of gluten-free bread and thought, ‘Wow, this stuff is terrible,’ ” she said. “I thought I could do better and thought because I didn’t need to eat gluten-free, I could hold it to a higher standard.”

So when the partners in that restaurant had the opportunity to buy a gluten-free bakery in Culver City, outside of Los Angeles, they asked the Irwins to join them, take a one-third ownership stake, and take over the running of the business.

The Sensitive Baker, as their bakery is called, is growing fast. “I spent years sitting in my office and didn’t realize how much I wanted to be out talking to people,” Mr. Irwin said, citing another important quotient to most people’s Plan B equations.

Elsewhere in Los Angeles, Paul and Marilyn King were going through a similar crisis. Their business, a contracting company that built and maintained commercial buildings across the country, had done very well for 20 years. But when the real estate industry collapsed, their business did, too.

“I was pretty much in a state of depression,” Mr. King said. “I didn’t want to do anything, I didn’t know what to do.”

In the past, his wife had conducted a side business baking wedding cakes and other custom cakes for friends, business clients and members of their church. She’d stopped a few years earlier after learning she was gluten-intolerant. But with their economic livelihood in a shambles, she came up with an idea to give it a try again, this time focusing on gluten-free products.

“One day my wife comes to me and says, ‘I’m going to start a bakery,’ ” Mr. King said. “I wasn’t the most supportive husband: ‘The worst economy in our lifetime — you want to start a business? Gluten-free?’ ”

He agreed to it as a “stopgap source of income.” Today it’s become an all-encompassing enterprise; their business, Tia’s Bakery, now sells gluten-free products in health and natural-food stores across the country, including Whole Foods stores in 14 states.

“There was a certain satisfaction in putting up a 10-story building,” Mr. King says of his old profession. “But it can’t be matched when someone thanks you for something you’ve given them that they haven’t been able to have.”

Nevertheless, the prospect of their gluten-free enterprise ever becoming as successful as their commercial real estate business is a long shot, Mr. King acknowledged. “Anyone who thinks they’re going to start a food company as we did, with no money, better be passionate about it,” he said. “If you’re in it for the money, good luck to you.”

But then again, Plan B’s are about so much more than getting rich.

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Haute Chocolate Summer Favorites – Perfect for Events and Fund Raisers

June 16th, 2011
 

Description Regular Lollipop – Heart

 

Meet any need! Heart shaped lollipop. Comes in plastic clamshell.
Choice of Dark or Milk chocolate.

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Description CHOCOLATE MEGA BAR

 

When you say it in Chocolate, you’ve said it all!
Comes in a plastic clear hinged box with a golden pad.
Choice of Dark and Milk Chocolate

Size = 7.5″ x 5″ Inches.
Weight = 8.4 Oz.
Minimum Order = 12 Bars.

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49 – 192 $13.99
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Description CHOCOLATE CORPORATE BAR  

When you say it in Chocolate, you’ve said it all!
Comes in a clear box with a golden pad and a fancy ribbon.
Choice of Dark and Milk Chocolate

Size = 8.5″ x 4.25″ Inches.
Weight = 13.6 Oz.
Minimum Order = 12 Bars.

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Description CHOCOLATE JUMBO BAR  

When you say it in Chocolate, you’ve said it all!
Comes in a clear box with a golden pad and a fancy ribbon.
Choice of Dark and Milk Chocolate

Size = 8.5″ x 4.25″ Inches.
Weight = 13.6 Oz.
Minimum Order = 12 Bars.

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49 – 192 $13.99
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Description CHOCOLATE GIFT BAR  

Elegant, pocket size chocolate gift bar. Great for any occasion.
Comes in a hard plastic case. Choice of Dark or Milk chocolate.

Size = 6″ x 2.25″ x 0.75″ Inches.
Weight = 4.6 Oz.
Minimum Order = 24 Bars.

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97 – 192 $8.49
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Description  CHOCOLATE PARTY FAVOR IN GIFT BOX – STAR 

Delicious and memorable! Round piece of chocolate with your image.
Encased in a golden box, clear top and a fancy ribbon.
Choice of Dark and Milk chocolate.

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Description CHOCOLATE TRADING CARD 

Immortalize your upcoming star on chocolate using our
fully customizable Chocolate Trading Card.
Comes in a hard plastic hinged case.
Choice of Dark and Milk chocolate.

Size = 3.5″ x 2.6″ Inches.
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Description Chocolate Party Favor Bag -Star 

Our delicious chocolate favors are sure to please your guests.
Comes in a beautiful party favor bag. Choice of Dark and Milk chocolate
and a variety of bag colors.

Size = 2″ x 3″ Diameter.
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Minimum Order = 24 Units.

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24 – 96 $2.89
97 – 192 $2.69
193 – 384 $2.49
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Description SMALL GIFT BOX 

Great corporate gift surrounded by 9 solid milk or dark chocolates.
Comes in a hard plastic case with a golden insert.

Size = 6″ x 4″ Inches.
Weight = 3.85 Oz.
Minimum Order = 24 Units.

Quantity Price
24 – 96 $9.99
97 – 192 $9.29
193 – 384 $8.49
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Description CHOCOLATE PARTY FAVOR IN GIFT BOX – SQUARE 

Delicious and memorable! Round piece of chocolate with your image.
Encased in a golden box, clear top and a fancy ribbon.
Choice of Dark and Milk chocolate.

Size = 3.2″ x 3.2″ Inches.
Weight = 3.2 Oz.
Minimum Order = 24 Pieces

Quantity Price
24 – 96 $4.99
97 – 192 $4.69
193 – 384 $4.39
385+ $3.99 OUR BEST PRICE
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Vaccine for Celiac Disease

June 16th, 2011

Vaccine for Celiac Disease

There has been quite a buzz recently over a new vaccine for those that suffer from Celiac Disease.  Will it successfully treat the autoimmune disorder and eliminate the need to adhere to a gluten free diet?

History:
July 22nd, 2010 the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute announced that a group of Doctors and Scientists had identified the three protein fragments toxic to people with Celiac Disease.  The research group headed by Dr. Bob Anderson head of the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute’s Coeliac Disease Research Laboratory, published their findings in the international journal Science Translational Medicine.
The Doctors and Scientists studied more than 200 Celiac Disease patients.  The patients ate bread, rye muffins or boiled barley.  Six days later, blood samples were taken to measure the strength of the patients’ immune responses to 2700 different gluten fragments (peptides). The responses identified 90 fragments as causing some level of immune reaction, but 3 gluten fragments were revealed as being particularly toxic, causing the majority of immune response in those with Celiac Disease.
Dr. Anderson, who is also the CEO of Nexpep Pty. Ltd., a Melbourne based biotech company, incorporated these findings of the 3 proprietary peptides to develop a ‘peptide-based’ immunotherapy.  The goal; create a vaccine to desensitize people with Celiac Disease to the toxic effects of gluten by injecting patients with small amounts of the three toxic peptides.  This is based upon the same principles as desensitization for allergies.

Testing a Vaccine:
The Phase I trial undertaken in Melbourne, Australia, evaluated the safety, tolerability and bioactivity (T-Cell Response) of the vaccine developed by Dr. Andersons’ Nexpep Pty. Ltd., known as Nexvac2.  During Phase I trials weekly injections were administered over a three week period.  34 healthy celiac patients of the HLA-DQ2 genotype who were on a strict gluten-free diet took part in this trial. 19 subjects were given the vaccine while the others were given a placebo.  Three different dosages; 30 micrograms, 60 micrograms and 90 micrograms were administered to the 19 subjects.  Subjects experienced some nausea and gastrointestinal distress, but these symptoms were worse for patients receiving the highest doses.  These patients had gastrointestinal symptoms similar to what they’d experience after eating gluten products and included vomiting.  One subject receiving 90 micrograms withdrew from the study due to extreme gastrointestinal distress.  Dr. Anderson and team believe this suggests the vaccine uses the correct peptides for eventually being able to tolerate gluten.
My Personal Thoughts:

As a Mother of a child with severe Celiac Disease, and a wife whose husband has silent/latent Celiac Disease, I question the current and future efficacy of this vaccine.  Several questions come to mind when I read the details of this study.  Dr. Anderson and his team found 2,700 gluten fragments (peptides) in the patients systems after ingesting wheat, barley and rye.  Of those 2,700 they believed that 90 fragments were causing a reaction to gluten.  The team then determined that the worst reactions were caused by 3 fragments, so that is where their focus lies, on only 3 of 2,700 potentially toxic peptides.

Another concern is that all grains contain gluten.  Dr. Anderson and team have only studied the effects of wheat, barley, and rye in this trial.  I have not found, in any of my research, their plans to incorporate other grains into their testing methodology.  Dr. Anderson admits that many Celiacs on a strict gluten free diet (a diet restricting wheat, barley and rye) still show signs of damage to their small intestine 2-5 years after removing gluten from their diets.  Could it be that healing has not occurred because Celiac patients have not eliminated all gluten containing grains from their diet?

While the news of this vaccine sounds promising Dr. Anderson and team will not know for many years whether these 3 “proprietary” peptides are truly the ones that cause damage to the small intestine.  We must also keep in mind that to date this vaccine has only been given to 19 people, those who carry the HLA-DQ2 genotype.  This genotype accounts for the majority of Celiac patients, approximately 80%, however, efficacy for patients who are HLA-DQ8, HLA-DR3 and those with Gluten Sensitivities has yet to be determined.
The Future of Nevax2 – Phase IIa Trials and Beyond:
Dr. Anderson’s Nexpep Pty. Ltd. was brought into the U.S. market, and is now ImmusanT.  Leslie J. Williams, a former venture partner with Battelle Ventures is now President and CEO of the privately held startup, and Dr. Anderson holds the position of Chief Scientific and Medical Officer.
It is expected that ImmusanT will begin Phase 2a trials of the Nexvax2 vaccine within the year.  The goal of Phase II is to demonstrate a dramatic reduction in the body’s rejection of dietary gluten. Anderson believes that upon repeated Nexvax2 administration, the number of gluten-specific T cells capable of triggering a pro-inflammatory response will subside, and regulatory suppressor T cells will increase in number to establish tolerance to dietary gluten.
Future plans for ImmusanT include collaborating with INOVA Diagnostics to improve and eventually replace the current testing substrates (including endoscopy) for Celiac Disease diagnosis.  Work to discover peptides for other variants of Celiac Disease (HLA-DQ8, and HLA-DR3).  Prevent Celiac Disease with Nevax2 in genetically susceptible patients, and use the vaccine for patients with IBS that respond to a gluten free diet.
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